Profiles of BBDC Members Primarily Involved In Diabetes Research

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Glazier, Rick - MD, MPH, FCFP

University of Toronto Appointment(s): Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine

Other Appointment(s): Senior Scientist, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences
Scientist, Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St. Michael's Hospital

Contact Information:

Centre for Research on Inner City Health
St. Michael's Hospital
30 Bond Street
Toronto, ON M5B 1W8

Phone: 416-864-6060 Ext: 77444
Email: glazierr@smh.ca

Diabetes Related Research Activities:

Diabetes in primary care – processes of care, impact of incentives, health disparities.
Risk factors for diabetes, especially socioeconomic status, ethnoracial background and immigration, neighbourhood walkability.

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Glogauer, Michael - DDS, PHD

University of Toronto Appointment(s): Associate Professor, Faculty of Dentistry; Faculty of Medicine

Other Appointment(s): Hospital For Sick Children, Mount Sinai Hospital, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and Toronto Rehab

Contact Information:

Room 221, Fitzgerald Building
150 College Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2

Phone: 416-978-0163
Fax: 416-978-5956
Email: michael.glogauer@utoronto.ca
Websites: http://matrixdynamics.ca

Diabetes Related Research Activities:

Impact of diabetes on innate immunity and neutrophil functions. Impact of diabetes on oral health and periodontal diseases. Impact of diabetes on osteoimmunology.

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Greenwood, Carol E. - PhD

University of Toronto Appointment(s): Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences

Other Appointment(s): Senior Scientist, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest

Contact Information:
Brain Health Complex, Rm 741
3560 Bathurst Street
Toronto, ON   M6A 2E1

Phone: 416-785-2500 ext 2785
Fax: 416-785-4230
Email: carol.greenwood@utoronto.ca
Websites: http://nutrisci.med.utoronto.ca/content/carol-greenwood

Diabetes Related Research Activities:

Research in the Greenwood lab is focused on understanding the effect of diet and metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes, on the retention or loss of cognitive function with aging. Our studies, in both humans and animal models, show that the consumption of diets which promote obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with more rapid decline in cognitive function.  By contrast, consumption of healthy diets associates with retention of cognitive function.  Our current interest lies in understanding the adverse brain effects of type 2 diabetes.  These studies draw on functional magnetic resonance imaging as a means of determining underlying neuronal pathways and neuronal responses which are impacted.

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Grynpas, Marc - PhD

University of Toronto Appointment(s): Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology

Other Appointment(s): Director, Bone and Mineral Group

Contact Information:

Mount Sinai Hospital
600 University Avenue, Suite 840
Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X5

Phone: 416-586-4800 Ext: 4464
Fax: 416-586-1554
Email: grynpas@lunenfeld.ca
Websites: http://www.mshri.on.ca/grynpas/default.asp

Diabetes Related Research Activities:

Our research focuses on the effects of diabetes on the skeletal system using pre-clinical models. Examples of our research includes:

1)  Effect of Vanadium Treatment on Bone Loss and Bone Quality in Rat Models of Diabetes. Vanadium compounds have been shown to be effective in experimental diabetes and insulin-resistant hypertension. However, these agents are known to accumulate in bone mineral where vanadate substitutes for phosphate. It is therefore essential to understand the long-term effects on these compounds on bone quality. (Facchini DM, Yuen VG, Battell ML, McNeill JH, Grynpas MD. The effects of vanadium treatment on bone in diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Bone. 2006; 38(3):368-77)

2)  The effect of Rosiglitazone treatment on bone quality in rat models of type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Rosiglitazone (RSG) is an insulin-sensitizing drug used to treat patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) to improve glycemic control. The ADOPT clinical trial showed that women taking RSG experienced more fractures. The purpose of our study is to understand the mechanism by which RSG induces limb fracture and alters bone quality in the insulin resistant Zucker Fatty rat.

3)  Comparison of the skeletal effects in the treatment of type2 diabetes with Sitagliptin (a DPP4 inhibitor) or Pioglitazone (a PPRgamma agonist) in mice fed a high fat diet.

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Hahn, Margaret - MD, PhD, FRCPC

University of Toronto Appointment(s): Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry

Other Appointment(s): Clinician Scientist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Complex Mental Illness
Director of Research, Mental Health and Metabolism Clinic, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Contact Information:
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
250 College St.
Toronto, ON   M5T 1R8

Phone: (416) 535-8501 ext. 4368
Fax: (416) 979-4292
Email: maggie.hahn@utoronto.ca

Diabetes Related Research Activities:

Dr. Hahn is a psychiatrist by training, who joined the University of Toronto (U of T) Faculty this spring following completion of a PhD, through the Institute of Medical Sciences, U of T. Her research interests lie in disentangling the complex relationship that underlies the illness of schizophrenia and the 3-5 fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes observed in this population. Her group’s preclinical work has focused on understanding the contribution of antipsychotic medications (which remain the cornerstone of treatment for the illness, but are linked with significant metabolic side-effects) to the risk of glucose dysregulation. Her work to date to elucidate underlying diabetogenic mechanisms of antipsychotics has pointed to specific neurotransmitter systems (i.e. dopaminergic, serotonergic, muscarinic), as well as centrally-mediated mechanisms. As a translational researcher, Dr. Hahn’s work has spanned preclinical rodent and human models of antipsychotic-induced glucose perturbations, including use of complex techniques to measure glucose metabolism (i.e. euglycemic and hyperglycemic clamps, the Frequently Sampled Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test), and has advanced to studying clinical interventions to mitigate these side-effects. 

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